Citi issues recycled plastic cards

Citi is to use recycled PVC (rPVC) for its corporate cards, with the roll-out starting in the EMEA region this month, before being adopted globally in phases.

The rPVC material being used typically comes from industries such as printing and packaging.

Every card will be made with 85 per cent of recycled industrial waste, delivering CO2 emission reductions of 36 per cent when compared to standard PVC cards, said Citi.

The bank is committed to achieving net zero emissions associated with its financing by 2050, and net zero emissions for its operations by 2030.

“Our focus is on reducing our carbon footprint, and the use of rPVC for our corporate cards is just one of the sustainable initiatives helping us to achieve this goal,” said Trudy Curtis, EMEA head of commercial cards at Citi Treasury and Trade Solutions. “As a dual network issuer, we are able to offer rPVC across both Mastercard and Visa."

    Share Story:

Recent Stories


New Business Frontiers
FStech’s Mark Evans discusses the future of financial services with Liu Jianning of Huawei, covering the limitations that current thinking can impose, how financial institutions can embrace technology to be both agile and resilient, and making space for the organisation to focus on the job of creating innovative business models and on delivering business value for their customers.

The Future of Intelligent Finance
FStech Group Editor Mark Evans sits down with Jason Cao, President of Global Financial Services Business Unit, Enterprise BG at Huawei ahead of its Intelligent Finance Summit which was held on 3rd and 4th of June in Shanghai. This Q&A delves into key trends in digital transformation of the financial services industry as well as a look at how data, robotic infrastructure, intelligent storage and innovative technologies are shaping the future for FSIs.

Cracking down on fraud
In this webinar a panel of expert speakers explored the ways in which high-volume PSPs and FinTechs are preventing fraud while providing a seamless customer experience.